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Event
Wednesday, 3 January, 1951

The Chinese Third Phase Offensive aimed to cross the 38th parallel and force the UN and the US to abandon Korea and concede the first global victory in what was being called the 'Cold War' The first major action for the 1st Battalion The Royal Ulster Rifles was on 3 January 1951, when the Battalion, as part of 29 Brigade, covered the withdrawal of UN forces to the south of the Han River and at the Battle of Chaegunghyon (better known as 'Happy Valley') checked the enemy advance.

Event
Monday, 4 December, 1950

(Below, The Royal Ulster Rifles marching through a Korean village, with vehicles of 45 Field Regiment, Royal Artillery in the background (© IWM (BF 392))

Event
Tuesday, 4 June, 1940

At the outbreak of war on 3 September 1939, the 1st Battalion The Royal Ulster Rifles was engaged in operational duties at Razani on the North West Frontier of India. During October, the Battalion spent its time carrying out such duties as keeping roads open to convoys, guarding convoys, and occasionally participating in punitive raids against the hostile tribesmen. In October, the Battalion returned to Rawalpindi.

Event
Friday, 9 February, 1816

In February 1816, the uneasy truce between the British and the Gurkhas during what was the Anglo-Nepalese War 1814-16, gave way to a resumption of hostilities. The 1st Battalion 87th Regiment, having left Mauritius on 16 June 1815, joined Major General Ochterlony's East India Company army near the Nepalese frontier.

Event
Tuesday, 10 December, 1805

In 1805, Bonaparte has crossed the River Danube and defeated General Mack's Austrian Army before Ulm. The British Prime Minister Pitt responded by mounting the diversionary Weser Expedition under Lieutenant General Sir George Don whose task was to assist the Allies by occupying Hanover and then marching on Holland.

Event
Sunday, 20 May, 1984

The first indication of rationalisation of The Ulster Defence Regiment occurred when the 1st and the 9th Battalion The Ulster Defence Regiment merged to form the 1st/9th (County Antrim) Battalion The Ulster Defence Regiment. The in-place location chosen for the Battalion Headquarters was the former 9 UDR Battalion Headquarters in the town of Antrim in County Antrim. Ballymena had been the location of 1 UDR's headquarters and, as both battalions had been located in County Antrim, it was appropriate that the new battalion title carried the county name.

Event
Saturday, 15 January, 1972

The Ulster Defence Regiment forms a new battalion titled the 10th (City of Belfast) Battalion (10 UDR) with its Battalion Headquarters located in Belfast.

Story

The Brigade was one of three infantry brigades in the 36th (Ulster) Division and was comprised of the four Belfast battalions of the Royal Irish Rifles, the 8th, 9th, 10th and 15th. The Brigade was commanded by Brigadier William M Withycombe, a veteran of the Boer War.

At last last light on 30 June, the final preparations could be made and 107 Brigade marched along country tracks, their way lit by red and green lanterns, into slit trenches in Aveluy Wood. This would be their assembly position for the attack.

Story

With its Headquarters at Hamel, Brigadier General C R Griffith's 108 Brigade, the left brigade of the 36th (Ulster) Division, was to attack astride the River Ancre into the 36th (Ulster) Division's left section and right centre section.

North of the Ancre, the 9th Battalion The Royal Irish Fusiliers (9th Faughs) and the 12th Battalion The Royal Irish Rifles (12 RIR) were to advance to their objective in the left section - Beaucourt railway station and the trenches immediately beyond it.

Story

The task for 109 Brigade in 36 (Ulster) Divisions 'right section' was to attack first the ‘A’ and ‘B’ lines and then advance to a line drawn from C 8 through B 16 to the Grandcourt-Thiepval Road at C 9; there it was to halt and consolidate.