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Event
Wednesday, 1 September, 1999

The 1st Battalion The Royal Irish Regiment became one of the founding units of 16 Air Assault Brigade alongside 1st, 2nd and 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, on 1 September 1999.

Event
Thursday, 14 July, 1904

In 1903, following a situation of many years of frontier violations and diplomatic failures, plus British assertions that Russia could threaten British India through Tibet, the British administration in India authorised an expedition that would be led by the British 'Commissioner to Tibet', Colonel Francis Younghusband from the Indian Political Service. It was based in northern India's Sikkim province. This combined diplomatic and military expedition aimed to compel the Tibetans to comply with British conditions.

Event
Wednesday, 14 February, 1951

The 1st Battalion The Royal Ulster Rifles, having taken over on 12 February 1951 the ground previously occupied by the US 5th Cavalry Regiment, was then ordered to advance on the left of 29 Brigade. The Brigade mission was to advance astride the road from Pabalmak to the River Han. The advance continued for several days over exceedingly rough countryside, a succession of steep hills and ridges. Although resupply became very difficult for the forward companies, the problem was lessened by the use of Korean porters.

Event
Sunday, 5 November, 1950

Pusan HarbourOn 5 November 1950, the Empire Pride, with the 1st Battalion The Royal Ulster Rifles on board, anchored in Pusan Harbour (right). Just after 1200 hours, the ship came alongside and later that night completed the disembarkation. The Battalion marched to the railway station through the chaos of military confusion and eventually entrained for the 200-mile journey to Suwon.

Event
Sunday, 17 June, 1951

Having returned to the line of the River Imjin, from 5 June 1951 onwards, the 1st Battalion The Royal Ulster Rifles began sending company sized patrols into enemy territory. United Nations battalions took turns at providing the cross-river patrols, and when not so engaged, they continued working and improving the defences of the Kansas Line. Gradually the enemy pulled back from the river and by 15 June were 8,000 yards away.

Event
Friday, 7 May, 1965

The 1st Battalion The Royal Ulster Rifles marched through Belfast and past the City Hall where the Lord Mayor and the Belfast City Corporation held a civic reception. The event marked the Battalion's return from their operational deployment during the 'Confrontation' with Indonesia in Sarawak on the island of Borneo.

Event
Saturday, 28 April, 1951

After the 65th Chinese Army had exhausted itself attempting to smash through the defensive positions on the River Imjin held by the British 29 Brigade, the Brigade withdrew to a new line south of the River Han where, on 26 and 27 April, it rested and refitted for future operations. The Brigade had sustained over one thousand casualties at Imjin and on 27 April, the 1st Battalion The Royal Ulster Rifles received a draft of 2 officers and 90 other ranks.

Event
Wednesday, 9 May, 1951

On 9 May 1951, the 1st Battalion The Royal Ulster Rifles moved from its reserve location in the chemical factory at Sosa-Ri on the Kimpo Peninsula to a forward position on the bank of the River Han and remained there for two weeks. One company occupied Hill 131, which afforded a good view of the surrounding area, while the remainder of the Battalion concentrated on the plain below.

Event
Monday, 9 January, 1939

The Waziristan campaign from 1936–39 was in fact a number of operations conducted by the British and Indian Army against the dissident tribesmen that inhabited the region. These operations were conducted in particular against the followers of Mirza Ali Khan, a Pashtun leader from the village of Ipi. His popular reference throughout India was the 'Faqir of Ipi', but to his Pathan followers he was known as 'Hajii Sahib'. He waged a guerrilla campaign against the British administration until the independence and partition of India in 1947.

Event
Thursday, 5 April, 1951

The 1st Battalion The Royal Ulster Rifles was in a defensive position on high ground some 2,000 metres south of the River Imjin. Since occupying the position on 1 April 1951, the companies had been patrolling frequently and reconnoitring the river for crossing places. C Company's main Observation Post was particularly popular because it commanded a good view to the north; whenever anyone spotted anything that appeared to be enemy activity, the American Army's Forward Observation Officer attached to C Company called for artillery fire.