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Event
Saturday, 1 July, 1972

The Ulster Defence Regiment formed a new battalion on 1 July 1972 titled the 11th (Craigavon) Battalion The Ulster Defence Regiment with its Battalion Headquarters located in Portadown.

Event
Thursday, 1 May, 1975 - Wednesday, 21 May, 1975

In May 1975 one hundred and eighty-seven officers and enlisted men of C Company Combat Team 12th US Infantry Regiment were hosted for an exchange visit by the School of Infantry. However, they were looked after by 1 R IRISH (the Demonstration Battalion) for most of their visit. The visitors were afforded traditional Irish hospitality by all and various competitions were organized as the Americans grew more expert in handling their hosts' weapons, vehicles and equipment.

Event
Thursday, 27 April, 1916

The Germans launched chemical (gas) attacks before dawn on 27 April against elements of I (British) Corps including 16th (Irish) Division. The attack was near Hulluch, about 1 mile to the north of Loos in the north of France. The gas and artillery attacks were followed by raids into the British lines. A change in wind direction thwarted a second attack on 29 April when the gas blew back over the German attackers and their front line, inflicting many casualties.

Event
Friday, 11 September, 1914

PosterArmy Order No. 382, dated 11 September 1914, authorised six divisions numbered from 15 to 20 for the Second New Army. The 16th (Irish) Division, at Mallow in County Cork, consisted of 47, 48 and 49 Brigade located respectively in Fermoy, Buttevant and Tipperary.

Event
Friday, 14 June, 1918

The 16th (Irish) Division returned to England from the continent on 14 June 1918 for reconstitution.

Event
Monday, 25 March, 1918

IWM Q60474Badly mauled around Ronssoy during the German Spring Offensive, the 16th (Irish) Division was much reduced by its cumulative losses during the retreat and was transferred from VII Corps to XIX Corps on 25 March 1918. It would remain with this formation and fight at the Battle of Rosières (26/27 March 1918).
Above left, a German column advances along the Albert-Bapaume road, March 1918 during Operation MICHAEL.

Event
Saturday, 9 September, 1916

The Battle for Ginchy was fought on 9 September 1916 during the second of the three operational phases of the Battle of the Somme and resulted in the capture of the German-held village by the 16th (Irish) Division.

Story

At the start of the First World War, the 1st Battalion The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers was based at Trimulgherrey in India. However, by the end of 1914 almost all regular army units across the British Empire were recalled to England, and the 1st Inniskillings disembarked at Avonmouth on 10 January 1915. The Battalion became part of 87 Infantry Brigade in the 29th Division* and was reviewed near Rugby by HM King George V, on 12 March 1915, prior to embarking for Egypt on 17 March, where the Inniskillings would prepare and train for the assault landings on the Gallipoli peninsula.

Story

After their initial landing at X Beach, the Inniskillings took part in successive attempts to capture the village of Krithia and the heights of Achi Baba, which had been the 29th Division’s objective on the first day. These main offensives, launched on 28 April, 6 May, 4 June and 28 June, all failed with limited gains and heavy losses on both sides. There were also strong and costly Turkish counter-attacks in between, as well as smaller scale patrolling and raiding operations. Krithia remained over 1000m away.

Event
Tuesday, 1 May, 1979 - Sunday, 1 May, 1983

1 R IRISH moved from Little Rissington to Berlin during May 1979 for a 3-year tour. Most tactical training and field firing was carried out in the British Zone. This usually meant a road move through the Russian Zone but on one occasion 1 R IRISH was deployed back from Sennelager to Berlin in case of a repeat of the Berlin Airlift when the road corridor was closed. Other training was carried out in Berlin.