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Artefact

In 1946, the Kenya African Union was formed with its main agitator Jomo Kenyatta, who was also the instigator of what came to be called the Mau Mau Rebellion. The Mau Mau at its height had around twelve thousand activists and the war against these fighters was conducted in the jungle around the Aberdare Mountain ranges. From 1952 to 1956 the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, the Royal Ulster Rifles and the Royal Irish Fusiliers were in turn sent there to protect the civilian population and hunt down the Mau Mau.

Artefact

This helmet plate worn c1830 by an officer of the 86th Foot shows "Quis Separabit", the Latin motto of the Regiment, which translates as “Who Shall Separate Us”.

Story

In 1915, the Allied commanders discussed plans for the offensive of 1916 that would win the war. The British favoured Ypres with its adjacent Belgian seaports and thus access to England. Logistics informed the decision and the area of the River Somme was chosen, for it marked the boundary between the French and British armies and would involve a minimal reorganisation of troops.

Person

William McFadzean was born in Lurgan, Co Armagh on 9 October 1895, the son of William and Annie McFadzean. His father came from Dundalk, Co Louth and his mother from Co Down.

Event
Sat, 03/12/1689 - Wed, 10/03/1691

The Williamite War is the title used in British history to describe the war waged in Ireland by King William III against King James II and his supporters (who had retained much of the control of Ireland following the conspiracy, known as the ‘Glorious Revolution’ that overthrew James). The war in Ireland was known as Cogadh an Dá Rí - the War of the Two Kings.

Artefact

This cigarette case embossed with the cap badge of the Royal Irish Rifles was found after the end of the First World War in the fields close to the city of Mons, the city that lent its name to the opening battle of the First World War. A packet of Wild Woodbine cigarettes normally contained five cigarettes.

Event
Tue, 06/26/1917

Both the 1st and the 2nd Battalion The Royal Irish Rifles were relieved from their positions in the Ypres Salient on 5 June 1917.

Event
Thu, 06/15/1837

The 89th Regiment was serving in the West Indies on 15 June 1837.

Artefact

The Young Citizen Volunteers (YCV) was formed in 1912 and joined with the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) in 1914 to become its Belfast battalion. Following the conversion of the UVF into the Ulster Division, the YCV became the 14th Battalion of the Royal Irish Rifles. Known as the 'Chocolate Box Soldiers' because of their immaculate turn out, they were recruited largely from Belfast's middle class.

Event
Fri, 09/27/1805

The 3rd Battalion 27th (Inniskillings) Regiment of Foot was raised at Dunbar on 27 September 1805 and was generally known in the Army as 'The Young Inniskillings'. While serving under the Duke of Wellington in the Peninsular War, the Battalion gained an excellent reputation for fighting the French, gaining many Battle Honours.